Quixotism

The Imaginative Denial of Spain's Loss of Empire

By Christopher Britt Arredondo

Subjects: Spanish Studies
Series: SUNY series in Latin American and Iberian Thought and Culture
Paperback : 9780791462560, 274 pages, December 2004
Hardcover : 9780791462553, 274 pages, December 2004

Alternative formats available from:

Table of contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction: Monumentalizing Quixote

PART I. THE BIRTH OF QUIXOTISM

1. Quixotist Madness

2. Quixotist Imagination

PART II. DECANDECE

3. Paralyzed Imperialism

4. Perverted Catholicism

5. Diminished Value

6. Resentful Masses

PART III. QUIXOTISM

7. Don Quixote as Spiritual Conquistador

8. Don Quixote as Messiah

9. Don Quixote as Lover

10. Don Quixote as Master

Conclusion: Spanish National Quixotism

Supplement: Don Quixote in Exile and Spain's Ex-colonies

Notes

Index

Exposes the cultural roots of Spanish fascism.

Description

Quixotism explores how a group of Spanish intellectuals, writing during the time of Restoration Spain (1876–1931), incorporated the figure of Don Quixote into an on-going debate on Spanish national and imperial decadence and used this figure to promote a nationalistic and jingoistic formula for national-imperial regeneration. Commonly known as the Generation of '98, these writers turned Spain's military defeat at the hands of an emerging American empire into a moral victory. Christopher Britt Arredondo uses the term Quixotism to denote a premodern heroic ideal centered on the figure of Don Quixote as he explores these writers. Here, he shows how Ganivet turns Quixote into a spiritual conquistador; Unamuno, into a tragic messiah; Maeztu, into a smiling priest; and Ortega, into a paternalistic master. Quixotism is a new critical category of political and cultural relevance, not only for fin-de-siècle Spain and the National-Catholic Spain of the Franco era, but also the democratic, postmodern Spain of today.

Christopher Britt Arredondo is Assistant Professor of Spanish at The George Washington University.