See Discontinued Series


African American Studies

African American Studies, John R. Howard and Robert C. Smith, eds.
Largely social scientific in methodology, the books in this series offer rigorous and innovative African American studies scholarship in the fields of political science, public policy, and sociology.

Afro-Latinx Futures, Vanessa K. Valdés, ed.
The Afro-Latinx Futures series is committed to publishing scholarly monographs and edited collections that center Blackness and Afrolatinidad from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives in the humanities and social sciences. Taking a hemispheric approach, we seek work that foregrounds the lives and contributions of Afro-Latinx peoples across Latin America, the Caribbean, and the diasporic U.S. and Canada. We welcome projects that introduce new historical figures and archival findings, focus on understudied regions and communities, establish innovative interdisciplinary frameworks, and challenge conventional canonical formations. Topics may include but are by no means limited to: afro-indigeneity, migration and exile, marronage/cimarronaje/quilombismo, literature, intellectual history, ethnography, geography, philosophy, performance and visual arts, and gender and sexuality. Above all, by centering Blackness and Afrolatinidad, this series aims to challenge the racial and ethnic frameworks, national imaginaries, and disciplinary constraints that continue to dominate study of the Americas and Caribbean and, more ambitiously, to help shape the future of such fields as Latin American Studies, African American Studies, Black Studies, Latinx Studies, Chicanx Studies, and American Studies.

Black Women’s Wellness, Stephanie Y. Evans, ed.
This series will publish scholarly monographs and edited volumes by, for, and about women in the African diaspora that illuminate the rich history, science, representations, and experiences of Black women’s wellness. Broadly defined as optimal health—including physical, psychological, emotional, social, spiritual, and sexual health—this inquiry into wellness is anchored in Black Women’s Studies (BWST), the goal of which has always been, in Barbara Smith’s words, “to save Black women’s lives.” Accordingly, the series will draw on and further expand BWST’s engagement with various theoretical frameworks, questions of identity, different disciplines, activism and social justice work, and location-based analysis. Topics may include healing, care and self-care, health challenges and crises, advocacy and policy, and practical strategies or program models for improving individual and collective well-being. Proposals are welcome from scholars and research collectives in and across public health, psychology, political science, sociology, anthropology, education, literature, history, religion, media, the arts, and fields such as disability studies and the medical humanities that might offer a unique approach to the study of race, gender, and wellness.

Multiethnic Literatures, Mary Jo Bona, ed.
This series is dedicated to publishing quality monographs and edited volumes that explore multiethnic literatures and other forms of cultural production from a variety of critical, material, theoretical, and comparative perspectives. Scholars of multiethnic American literatures are increasingly in dialogue with new research in the fields not only of critical race, legal, and ethnic studies, but also of migration and mobility studies, postcolonial studies, and diaspora and other transnational literary studies. The series especially seeks studies with frameworks attuned to the complex intersections between ethnic identities and dynamics of class, gender, race, sexuality, and citizenship status.

Philosophy and Race, Robert Bernasconi and T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, eds.
The series tackles abstract questions like the concept of race and epistemological foundations of racism, concrete investigations of subjects ranging from the incarceration of political activists of color to race and nationality in the post-9/11 United States, and studies of how philosophers such as Nietzsche and Sartre can be read within a framework of race. Also looks at primary source material of such 18th-century philosophers as Kant and his writings on race.

American Studies

Italian/American Culture, Fred Gardaphé, ed.
This series is the first and, to date, only series to focus exclusively on the study of Italian American culture. Italian Americans comprise the fifth largest ethnic group in the United States and are deeply entwined with the history of New York State, yet Italian Americans have only recently begun to systematically study and evaluate their culture. Because of the diverse nature of the field, the series is open to a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, sociology, literature, history, philosophy, linguistics, and media studies, as well as a variety of forms, including traditional academic monographs, oral histories, fiction, and creative nonfiction. With the establishment of the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute as a permanent research facility in the CUNY system, along with the Program in Italian American Studies and the Alfonse M. D'Amato Chair in Italian American and Italian Studies at SUNY Stony Brook, the future for Italian American studies is bright, and this series provides Italian American scholars and writers an opportunity to develop important contributions to this growing field of study.

Multiethnic Literatures, Mary Jo Bona, ed.
This series is dedicated to publishing quality monographs and edited volumes that explore multiethnic literatures and other forms of cultural production from a variety of critical, material, theoretical, and comparative perspectives. Scholars of multiethnic American literatures are increasingly in dialogue with new research in the fields not only of critical race, legal, and ethnic studies, but also of migration and mobility studies, postcolonial studies, and diaspora and other transnational literary studies. The series especially seeks studies with frameworks attuned to the complex intersections between ethnic identities and dynamics of class, gender, race, sexuality, and citizenship status.

Native Traces: Original Studies about American Indians, Scott Richard Lyons, ed
Native American Indians are the traces of distinct continental cultures, and a crucial presence in contemporary literature and history. Native Traces is an interdisciplinary series of innovative critical studies by and about the literatures, cultures, and histories of American Indians. Publications in this series revisit long-standing notions and assumptions, past and present, and offer different and often radical ways of understanding the history and heritage of Native American Indians.

Trans-Indigenous Decolonial Critiques, Arturo Arias, ed.
This series explores the complexity and current debates of interdisciplinary Global Indigenous Studies from multiple decolonial perspectives that challenge accepted truths about Indigenous subjects. Books in the series offer multidisciplinary alternatives broadly based on transnational, hemispheric, or global positionalities that may be located in such areas of study as identity, sovereignty, politics and rights, racism, visual arts and performance, literatures, Indigenous feminisms, Indigenous queer politics, or ecocriticism.

Tribal Worlds: Critical Studies in American Indian Nation Building, Brian Hosmer and Larry Nesper, eds.
Tribal Worlds showcases emerging research on how the Native peoples of North America have forged modern indigenous communities amidst national and international pressures as well as the ongoing effects of colonialism. The series is particularly interested in studies that blend ethnography with archival research, that situate current expressions of tribal governance and reservation political economy within comparative and historical contexts, or that focus on conditions of settler colonialism and tribal nation building. This series also encourages studies that engage emerging methodological and interpretive issues, particularly as they engage current issues and challenges.

Anthropology

National Identities, Thomas M. Wilson, ed.
An interdisciplinary, transnational series that explores the many social and cultural factors that construct national identity in the everyday lives of the people who subscribe to being part of a “nation.”

Asian Studies

Asian Studies Development, Roger T. Ames and Peter D. Hershock, eds.
Books in this series are intended to help undergraduate faculty, trained largely in Western material, expand their knowledge of Asian studies. As worldviews change from Eurocentric to global and much that was taught before was admittedly stereotypical or insubstantial, many faculty want and need to expand their knowledge of Asian culture, philosophy, and history.

Chinese Philosophy and Culture, Roger T. Ames, ed.
This series provides a broad consideration of Chinese philosophy and culture, encompassing both historical sinological research and more purely philosophical work. It covers material from early China to the modern period, and includes philosophy, religion, literature, the arts, and culture generally. A well-regarded and prominent component of the series is work in comparative East-West philosophy.

Hindu Studies, Wendy Doniger, ed.
This is a series on the Hindu religion, including considerations of texts and practices. It also includes larger considerations of Indian culture heavily embedded in Hinduism, such as scholarship on imaginative literature in Indian languages.

Translating China, Roger T. Ames and Paul J. D’Ambrosio, eds
China and Chinese culture—arguably the most antique and persistent cultural tradition in human history—are still relatively unknown and often misunderstood outside of China. The aim of this series is to promote real world literacy in Chinese philosophy and culture by offering scholarly monographs, edited volumes, and translations by and about prominent intellectual figures in the contemporary Chinese world.

Communication

Studies in Technical Communication, Miles A. Kimball and Charles H. Sides, eds.
Broad and interdisciplinary in scope, this series extends to technical communication and related fields from all angles. The series aims to encompass not only technical communication in corporations, but studies of government, health, and military communication; the history of technical communication; and the role of technical communication in culture and technology. The series is equally friendly to research and theory, and equally committed to including qualitative and quantitative approaches to scholarship. Edited collections of new scholarship are welcome, as well as traditional book-length monographs.

Cultural Studies

Afro-Latinx Futures, Vanessa K. Valdés, ed.
The Afro-Latinx Futures series is committed to publishing scholarly monographs and edited collections that center Blackness and Afrolatinidad from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives in the humanities and social sciences. Taking a hemispheric approach, we seek work that foregrounds the lives and contributions of Afro-Latinx peoples across Latin America, the Caribbean, and the diasporic U.S. and Canada. We welcome projects that introduce new historical figures and archival findings, focus on understudied regions and communities, establish innovative interdisciplinary frameworks, and challenge conventional canonical formations. Topics may include but are by no means limited to: afro-indigeneity, migration and exile, marronage/cimarronaje/quilombismo, literature, intellectual history, ethnography, geography, philosophy, performance and visual arts, and gender and sexuality. Above all, by centering Blackness and Afrolatinidad, this series aims to challenge the racial and ethnic frameworks, national imaginaries, and disciplinary constraints that continue to dominate study of the Americas and Caribbean and, more ambitiously, to help shape the future of such fields as Latin American Studies, African American Studies, Black Studies, Latinx Studies, Chicanx Studies, and American Studies.

Global Modernity, Arif Dirlik, Ravi Arvind Palat, and Roxann Prazniak, eds.
The globalization of capitalism since the 1980s has also globalized capitalist modernity and, rather than leading to social and cultural homogeneity, new fault lines have emerged within and across societies. Ironically, the global capitalist economy appears to have generated renewed fervor for the resurrection or revitalization of cultural and religious traditions that were once deemed incompatible with modernity, but which now mark alternative modernities and alternative claims on modernity. This series in global modernity is dedicated to publishing quality monographs and edited volumes that explore the various dimensions of contemporary struggles over modernity, and the historical resources that animate them.

Praxis: Theory in Action, Nancy A. Naples, ed.
Praxis: Theory in Action highlights the exciting, innovative, and interdisciplinary research on the intersection of theory and practice that has been the hallmark of critical feminist, queer, postcolonial, and race studies since the inception of these interdisciplinary academic fields. This new SUNY Press series seeks to bring together the work of scholars, activists, and scholar-activists in order to forge new connections between academic inquiry and on-the-ground strategies to create social change.

Trans-Indigenous Decolonial Critiques, Arturo Arias, ed
This series explores the complexity and current debates of interdisciplinary Global Indigenous Studies from multiple decolonial perspectives that challenge accepted truths about Indigenous subjects. Books in the series offer multidisciplinary alternatives broadly based on transnational, hemispheric, or global positionalities that may be located in such areas of study as identity, sovereignty, politics and rights, racism, visual arts and performance, literatures, Indigenous feminisms, Indigenous queer politics, or ecocriticism.

Education

Critical Race Studies in Education, Derrick R. Brooms, ed.
This series is committed to publishing scholarly monographs and edited volumes that use a critical race lens to investigate a range of educational settings, systems, and experiences. Possible areas of focus include but are not limited to undergraduate and graduate education, K–12, language and literacy, pedagogy, policy, political economy, governance, and curriculum. Diverse critical frameworks and methodologies are welcome from fields such as education, sociology, anthropology, rhetoric and composition, linguistics, history, philosophy, Africana and Black studies, Indigenous studies, Latinx studies, ethnic studies, women’s and gender studies, and queer studies. Of particular interest are studies that not only shed light on race and racism as institutional norms and structural phenomena in education but also make space for the stories of students, teachers, staff, and communities.

Global Issues in Higher Education, Kevin Kinser, Jason E. Lane, and S. Ilgu Ozler, eds.
The SUNY Series in Global Issues in Higher Education promotes new research about the ways that globalization and internationalization are transforming all aspects of higher education. While we welcome a wide range of disciplinary, institutional, and comparative perspectives, we have a particular interest in studies of cross-border higher education that focus on the mobility of students, faculty, leaders, programs, and values. In exploring new trends and challenges, this series responds to a pressing need to understand the interconnectedness of nation-states, cultures, and economies, as well as the changing role of colleges and universities in their local communities and on the world stage.

Transforming Subjects: Psychoanalysis, Culture, and Studies in Education, Deborah Britzman, ed.
This series seeks to challenge our understanding of the human predicaments of education writ large—what it is and does, on what grounds, and with whom—by bringing together new psychosocial approaches to transforming subjects. As “home” for a wide range of studies in psychoanalysis, aesthetics, literature, culture, social thought, social change, pedagogy, and philosophy, the series welcomes manuscripts that link changes in our emotional worlds to the great problems of our time. Of special interest are analyses of scenes of learning as transformations in psychosocial life and experiences in thinking education anew.

Film Studies

Horizons of Cinema, Murray Pomerance, ed.
Horizons of Cinema aims to publish accessible, critical, and appealing studies of the history, production, cultural reception, and social meaning of film, considered either retrospectively or with a view to future developments (or both). Subjects may include specific films, filmmakers, genres, historical eras of film production, and production processes; as well as multicultural, ethnographic, technical, and theoretical aspects of cinema.

Latin American Cinema, Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado and Leslie L. Marsh, eds.
This series welcomes submissions of monographs dedicated to the study of Latin American cinema. We seek both works that focus on regional clusters (such as the Andean region, the Southern Cone, Central America, or the Spanish Caribbean) and also on the focused analysis of the national and sub-national film traditions of the region. The series will publish works on any part of the historical arc of Latin American cinema, from its earliest iterations to contemporary production. The topics that will be addressed include but are not limited to: production and distribution structures; textual and formal analysis of films; audience and reception studies; theoretical approaches; historical and archival studies; and studies of key directors, films, and movements. We also welcome work engaged with cutting-edge theoretical approaches and the study of periods and films currently under-represented in existing scholarship.

Gender And Sexuality

Black Women’s Wellness, Stephanie Y. Evans, ed.
This series will publish scholarly monographs and edited volumes by, for, and about women in the African diaspora that illuminate the rich history, science, representations, and experiences of Black women’s wellness. Broadly defined as optimal health—including physical, psychological, emotional, social, spiritual, and sexual health—this inquiry into wellness is anchored in Black Women’s Studies (BWST), the goal of which has always been, in Barbara Smith’s words, “to save Black women’s lives.” Accordingly, the series will draw on and further expand BWST’s engagement with various theoretical frameworks, questions of identity, different disciplines, activism and social justice work, and location-based analysis. Topics may include healing, care and self-care, health challenges and crises, advocacy and policy, and practical strategies or program models for improving individual and collective well-being. Proposals are welcome from scholars and research collectives in and across public health, psychology, political science, sociology, anthropology, education, literature, history, religion, media, the arts, and fields such as disability studies and the medical humanities that might offer a unique approach to the study of race, gender, and wellness.

Feminist Criticism and Theory, Michelle Massé, ed.
For over 20 years, this series has offered monographs and edited volumes that exemplify contemporary feminist thought. The series originally focused on feminist literary criticism, and in recent years it has broadened its focus to include more activist and interdisciplinary approaches.
Although we seek new manuscripts across this wide range of topics and across disciplinary fields, we are particularly interested in proposals that analyze gendered lives in academia through Critical University Studies, as well as those that explore the gendered dimensions of life stages via the interdisciplinary field of Age Studies.

Gender Theory, Tina Chanter, ed.
This series features works of philosophy on gender, sexual difference and the concept of “the other,” reproduction, and feminism, drawing from philosophers like Julia Kristeva, Luce Irigaray, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jean-François Lyotard, touching on other fields such as literature and film, rhetoric, public policy, law, and psychoanalysis. The series also features collections devoted to the work of Julia Kristeva, Sarah Kofman, Teresa Brennan, and Drucilla Cornell.

Genders in the Global South, Debra A. Castillo and Shelley Feldman, eds.
The specific concern of this series is to take up the challenge to explore more fully the intersection of critical large categories—gender, sexuality, dislocation/displacement—in addition to questions of identity and generation in the global south. The series will set up an engagement across Partition Studies in South Asia and Border Studies in the Latin American context. Rich analyses also will involve comparative case studies of other relevant world borders outside this framework; thus, the series will also accept proposals from scholars working on other southern locations, including, and importantly, Africa and East Asia.

Queer Politics and Cultures, Cynthia Burack and Jyl J. Josephson, eds.
In recent years, vigorous public and intellectual debates over LGBTQIA gender and sexuality have given rise to new interdisciplinary fields of inquiry. This series is dedicated to publishing monographs and edited volumes that explore the wide range of topics, approaches, and intellectual investments in LGBTQIA studies. Books in this series represent a range of identitarian and nonidentitarian perspectives: from interdisciplinary scholarship on gender and sexuality to LGBTQIA research in politics, cultural studies, history, psychology, geography, anthropology, and related disciplines.

We welcome submissions that explore topics such as: pro- and anti-LGBTQIA activism, organizing, policy, and state-building; LGBTQIA youth, communities, and family formation; institutional discrimination, rights recognition, and citizenship; transnationalism and border-crossing; media and communication; religion and spirituality; hetero-, homo-, and transnormativity; social, cultural, and psychological processes; and the intersections of sexualities and gender identities with race, ethnicity, nationality, and class. We seek projects from a variety of (inter)disciplinary perspectives that employ a range of methods and theoretical approaches.

Jewish Studies

Contemporary Jewish Literature and Culture, Ezra Cappell, ed.
This series is dedicated to publishing the most provocative and original manuscripts in the field of Jewish literature and culture. While the primary focus of the series is on the contemporary period, manuscripts dealing with earlier periods of Jewish literary history will be considered as well. We welcome proposals from diverse Jewish cultural perspectives, and given the complex interdisciplinary nature of Jewish studies, we will consider manuscripts from a wide variety of scholarly methods and critical approaches. We publish manuscripts that have original insight, that are clearly written, and that appeal to both the scholarly community and the broad reading public beyond the academy.

Contemporary Jewish Thought, Richard A. Cohen, ed.
Throughout the twentieth century, and especially in the United States, France, Germany, and Israel, Jewish thought has been creative, profound, and productive, drawing on such diverse disciplines as philosophy, religious studies, historiography, feminism, literary studies, mysticism, aesthetics, and political theory. In all these areas the stimulus for intellectual development has come not only from internal developments within the long tradition of Jewish civilization, but also, and often most poignantly, from areas outside of Judaism and Jewish thought proper. Under the general editorship of Richard A. Cohen, this series seeks to publish books that explore and extend the boundaries of contemporary Jewish thought.

Latin American Studies

Afro-Latinx Futures, Vanessa K. Valdés, ed.
The Afro-Latinx Futures series is committed to publishing scholarly monographs and edited collections that center Blackness and Afrolatinidad from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives in the humanities and social sciences. Taking a hemispheric approach, we seek work that foregrounds the lives and contributions of Afro-Latinx peoples across Latin America, the Caribbean, and the diasporic U.S. and Canada. We welcome projects that introduce new historical figures and archival findings, focus on understudied regions and communities, establish innovative interdisciplinary frameworks, and challenge conventional canonical formations. Topics may include but are by no means limited to: afro-indigeneity, migration and exile, marronage/cimarronaje/quilombismo, literature, intellectual history, ethnography, geography, philosophy, performance and visual arts, and gender and sexuality. Above all, by centering Blackness and Afrolatinidad, this series aims to challenge the racial and ethnic frameworks, national imaginaries, and disciplinary constraints that continue to dominate study of the Americas and Caribbean and, more ambitiously, to help shape the future of such fields as Latin American Studies, African American Studies, Black Studies, Latinx Studies, Chicanx Studies, and American Studies.

Latin American Cinema, Ignacio M. Sánchez Prado and Leslie L. Marsh, eds.
This series welcomes submissions of monographs dedicated to the study of Latin American cinema. We seek both works that focus on regional clusters (such as the Andean region, the Southern Cone, Central America, or the Spanish Caribbean) and also on the focused analysis of the national and sub-national film traditions of the region. The series will publish works on any part of the historical arc of Latin American cinema, from its earliest iterations to contemporary production. The topics that will be addressed include but are not limited to: production and distribution structures; textual and formal analysis of films; audience and reception studies; theoretical approaches; historical and archival studies; and studies of key directors, films, and movements. We also welcome work engaged with cutting-edge theoretical approaches and the study of periods and films currently under-represented in existing scholarship.

Latin American and Iberian Thought and Culture, Rosemary G. Feal, ed., and Jorge J. E. Gracia, founding ed.
For 30 years, this series has published works on the culture and intellectual history of Latin America, Spain, Portugal, and the Hispanophone and Lusophone world. Remaining deliberately open to wide-ranging subjects and approaches, it currently seeks broad disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies of various forms of cultural production (e.g., literature, the arts, philosophy, political and social thought), as well as more specific investigations of key historical and contemporary issues in Latin American and Iberian culture and society (e.g., issues of intersecting identities).

Literature

Afro-Latinx Futures, Vanessa K. Valdés, ed.
The Afro-Latinx Futures series is committed to publishing scholarly monographs and edited collections that center Blackness and Afrolatinidad from a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives in the humanities and social sciences. Taking a hemispheric approach, we seek work that foregrounds the lives and contributions of Afro-Latinx peoples across Latin America, the Caribbean, and the diasporic U.S. and Canada. We welcome projects that introduce new historical figures and archival findings, focus on understudied regions and communities, establish innovative interdisciplinary frameworks, and challenge conventional canonical formations. Topics may include but are by no means limited to: afro-indigeneity, migration and exile, marronage/cimarronaje/quilombismo, literature, intellectual history, ethnography, geography, philosophy, performance and visual arts, and gender and sexuality. Above all, by centering Blackness and Afrolatinidad, this series aims to challenge the racial and ethnic frameworks, national imaginaries, and disciplinary constraints that continue to dominate study of the Americas and Caribbean and, more ambitiously, to help shape the future of such fields as Latin American Studies, African American Studies, Black Studies, Latinx Studies, Chicanx Studies, and American Studies.

History of Books, Publishing, and the Book Trades, Ann R. Hawkins, Sean C. Grass, and E. Leigh Bonds, eds.
This series welcomes argument-driven studies that foreground the materiality of texts, such as (but not limited to) bibliography, manuscript, book, and periodical history; illustration and the book arts; print culture; printing and publishing history; adaptation studies; textual criticism; music, theater, film, and performance studies; remediation and digital textual studies. We are especially interested in innovative interdisciplinary work that reshapes current methodologies or that brings established methods to bear on new subjects.

Literature…in Theory, David E. Johnson and Scott Michaelsen, eds.
In our current post-human, post-theoretical, and post-critical environment, literature seems to have lost its place. It is either considered ubiquitous, located in all narrative arts and sciences or rendered invisible, its specificity dismissed in favor of its ostensibly anthropological, historical, philosophical, and psychological claims. There is also the uncertainty of theory. The end of French Theory, or critical theory, or post-structuralism, has been proclaimed many times in recent decades. And yet theory persists. Literature . . . in Theory questions what constitutes literature, theory, and the world. This series is interdisciplinary and comparative; its books provide the necessary conceptual tools for explaining what literature is and does and how it relates to other discourses or disciplines.

Multiethnic Literatures, Mary Jo Bona, ed.
This series is dedicated to publishing quality monographs and edited volumes that explore multiethnic literatures and other forms of cultural production from a variety of critical, material, theoretical, and comparative perspectives. Scholars of multiethnic American literatures are increasingly in dialogue with new research in the fields not only of critical race, legal, and ethnic studies, but also of migration and mobility studies, postcolonial studies, and diaspora and other transnational literary studies. The series especially seeks studies with frameworks attuned to the complex intersections between ethnic identities and dynamics of class, gender, race, sexuality, and citizenship status.

Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century, Pamela K. Gilbert, ed.
One of the most exciting trends in scholarship on the nineteenth century is the tendency to redraw the boundaries of its chronological, national, and disciplinary limits. Under the general editorship of Pamela K. Gilbert, this series publishes books that are open to such boundary transgressions, including not only comparative studies between the United States and Europe, but also books that extend the “Long Nineteenth Century” back in time to the mid–seventeen hundreds and forward through the fin de siècle and its connections to twentieth-century modernism. Interdisciplinary in nature, the series welcomes projects that intersect a variety of fields, including literature, history, anthropology, history of medicine, urban studies, musicology, architecture, gender studies, art, science and technology studies, postcolonial studies, and subaltern studies.

Music

Jazz Styles, SUNY Press, ed.
NEW SERIES: We are actively soliciting submissions. SUNY Press Jazz Styles publishes brief, introductory volumes aimed at the general reader and college-level student who wishes to learn more about the basic jazz genres, from the turn of the twentieth century to today.  These volumes are designed to highlight each style's key performers and promoters, how it has evolved over time, and what its continuing relevance is today.

Contemporary Writings on Jazz, Ben Bierman, ed.
NEW SERIES: We are actively soliciting submissions. Contemporary Writings on Jazz focuses on current approaches to the research and discussion of jazz-related musics. This series examines music from a wide and open perspective that is sensitive to critical issues of this moment, including race, gender, technology, intellectual property, and appropriation. The goal of the series is to contribute to the process of broadening the way we talk and think about music as well as how we discuss its place in society. We seek to be a welcoming home for a rich array of voices, viewpoints, perspectives, topics, and approaches, both from within and outside the academy.

New York Studies

An American Region: Studies in the Hudson Valley, Thomas Wermuth, ed.
From Henry Hudson's initial explorations in 1609 to the recent controversy over dredging for PCBs, the Hudson Valley has been a microcosm of America. Devoted solely to the study of the Hudson River and its environs, this series publishes academic and trade books that aim to advance our understanding of this important region and the major role it has played in the historical, cultural, financial, and political development of the United States.

New York Classics, SUNY Press, ed.
New York Classics offers new editions of classic works of fiction and nonfiction that focus on New York's history and culture.  Each volume is newly edited and introduced by a scholar in the field.  Titles range from the nature writings of John Burroughs and Elizabeth C. Wright and volumes on county history and genealogy to unjustly neglected works of fiction and classic works on state landmarks. Popularly priced for the general reader, New York Classics celebrates the wide diversity of notable works that center on the Empire State.

Philosophy

American Philosophy and Cultural Thought, Randall Auxier and John Shook, eds.
This series is a home for exegetical and exploratory philosophical work on traditions, movements, and thinkers that have enlivened intellectual life and culture in North America, regardless of origin, from pre-colonial to contemporary times. Applications of philosophical positions to practical, ethical, and civic issues are welcome. The series encourages interdisciplinary approaches and a wide range of international as well as domestic perspectives. The series also publishes critical volumes and readers devoted to a single thinker.

Ancient Greek Philosophy, Anthony Preus, ed.
This series inclues scholarship on rhetoric, ethics, politics, science, and justice, with books on Plato, Aristotle, various pre-Socratic thinkers such as Anaximander, and the Neoplatonists.

Chinese Philosophy and Culture, Roger T. Ames, ed.
This series provides a broad consideration of Chinese philosophy and culture, encompassing both historical sinological research and more purely philosophical work. It covers material from early China to the modern period, and includes philosophy, religion, literature, the arts, and culture generally. A well-regarded and prominent component of the series is work in comparative East-West philosophy.

Contemporary Continental Philosophy, Dennis J. Schmidt, ed.
One of the Press’s premier series, it contains an extensive collection of works in continental philosophy. The series features monographs from top scholars such as David Farrell Krell, John Sallis, Charles E. Scott, Calvin Schrag, Jacques Taminiaux, and Joan Stambaugh, as well as rising stars in the field. Dozens of key translations are also featured, including several by Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, F. W. J. Schelling, and Gunter Figal.

Contemporary French Thought, David Pettigrew and François Raffoul, eds.
Series devoted to French thinkers in the continental tradition, such as Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, Juan-David Nasio, Jacques Derrida, Georges Bataille, Henri Bergson, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jean-Luc Nancy.

Contemporary Italian Philosophy, Silvia Benso and Brian Schroeder, eds.
This series showcases for English readers the original work of present-day Italian philosophers working in the continental tradition. In addition to monographs and edited volumes, the series also publishes translations and critical volumes devoted to a single thinker. There are planned translations as well as critical volumes devoted to this work.

Environmental Philosophy and Ethics, J. Baird Callicott and John van Buren, eds.
This series includes original works in the philosophy of environmental ethics and secondary works examining how philosophers such as Martin Heidegger, John Dewey, Friedrich Nietzsche, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Gilles Deleuze speak to environmental concerns. The series also features tributes to thinkers such as Rachel Carson and Gregory Bateson, and career-spanning overviews of the work of contemporary environmental philosophers.

Gender Theory, Tina Chanter, ed.
This series features works of philosophy on gender, sexual difference and the concept of “the other,” reproduction, and feminism, drawing from philosophers like Julia Kristeva, Luce Irigaray, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jean-François Lyotard, touching on other fields such as literature and film, rhetoric, public policy, law, and psychoanalysis. The series also features collections devoted to the work of Julia Kristeva, Sarah Kofman, Teresa Brennan, and Drucilla Cornell.

Insinuations: Philosophy, Psychoanalysis, Literature, Charles Shepherdson, ed.
This series focuses on the overlap between contemporary continental philosophy and the adjacent fields of rhetoric, literary theory, and psychoanalysis, with an emphasis on how these intersections contribute to cultural theory.

Intersections: Philosophy and Critical Theory, Rodolphe Gasché, ed.
Philosophical, critical, and literary theory from German Romanticism to French continental philosophy and beyond, featuring works by Novalis, Alain Badiou, Friedrich Schlegel, Giorgio Agamben, and Georges Bataille.

Philosophy and Race, Robert Bernasconi and T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting, eds.
The series tackles abstract questions like the concept of race and epistemological foundations of racism, concrete investigations of subjects ranging from the incarceration of political activists of color to race and nationality in the post-9/11 United States, and studies of how philosophers such as Nietzsche and Sartre can be read within a framework of race. Also looks at primary source material of such 18th-century philosophers as Kant and his writings on race.

Theology and Continental Thought, Douglas L. Donkel, ed.
Recently, theologians and scholars of religion have become increasingly interested in the theological implications of recent continental thought, while a growing number of philosophers working in the continental tradition have shown a reciprocal interest in the theological commitments and resources latent in that tradition. This Series is dedicated to publishing quality monographs, edited volumes, and translations that explore the multiple themes and issues resident at the intersection of these traditions.

Western Esoteric Traditions, David Appelbaum, ed.
The books in this series touch on the full range of esoteric thought, spanning Gnosticism, Hermetism, magic, astrology, alchemy, Rosicrucianism, Christian Theosophy, and more. Although primarily Western in focus, the series features material on various strands of Eastern religions—Buddhist, Hindu, and Sufi—that share esoteric orientation and influence. The series includes both original contributions and secondary works in religious studies, literature, history, and philosophy.

Political Science

American Constitutionalism, Robert J. Spitzer, ed.
Encouraging interdisciplinary inquiries, this series features both traditional and new perspectives on American constitutionalism. We welcome traditional examinations of constitutional issues that incorporate court cases, the rule of law, constitutional history and development, civil liberties and civil rights, the separation of powers, and the role of the courts. Also of great interest are modes of constitutional inquiry that look at the role of institutions beyond the courts, relations between received constitutional meaning and popular understanding, and the myriad connections between law and politics.

Comparative Politics, Gregory S. Mahler, ed.
This series publishes cutting-edge work in comparative politics, with a focus on those studies emphasizing the importance of political institutions and political structures and the way that these affect political behavior and public policy. Each book in the series will demonstrate a mastery of material though the use of empirical data and appropriate methodological analysis. We seek manuscripts for this series that are comparative in scope and perspective and that also do an effective job of showing the relationship between conventional political-analytic studies of institutions and the more “relevant” policy studies.

Environmental Governance: Local-Regional-Global Interactions, Peter Stoett and Owen Temby, eds.
This series seeks to publish high quality research that simultaneously examines the evolving dialogue between actors and institutions at the local, regional, and global level with regard to present environmental challenges. The series welcomes contributions in the areas of comparative environmental politics, global environmental politics, international political economy, green political theory, natural resources and public policy, sustainable energy policy, urban environmental politics, and ecology and human rights.

Ethics and the Challenges of Contemporary Warfare, Steven C. Roach, ed.
At a time when identity politics and racial wars have captured global attention, new autonomous weapons systems, cyber capabilities, and robotic intelligence are impacting the role of human identity and strategy-making in twenty-first century modern warfare. This has provoked growing debate about the rules of war, ethics, governance, and security in contemporary warfare. The most pressing need for many is to rethink the role of human values, emotions, interests, and identity in terms of the changing conditions of modern warfare. This series is interested in books that address this need in broad, creative, and rigorous ways. It encourages new thinking and dynamic approaches that engage the ethical, cultural, political, legal, and strategic challenges of global security and governance in twenty-first century warfare. In doing so, it invites books that will analyze the limits and potential of existing rules, laws, and institutions, and explore the changing conditions of modern warfare.

James N. Rosenau Series in Global Politics, David C. Earnest, ed.
This series, established in honor of the late James N. Rosenau, a former SUNY Press author and series editor, seeks to publish innovative books that acknowledge that the world is undergoing profound transformations even as the habits of people and collectives resist change. Books in the series will embrace the whole range of issues on the global agenda and will do so using a wide variety of methodologies.

New Political Science, Bradley J. Macdonald, ed.
A series of scholarly monographs and edited volumes that takes seriously that the study of politics is not just about understanding the world but also about creating the possibility for radical and progressive change towards justice and a fuller democratic life. The series is open to all fields of Political Science, as well as a variety of approaches, and is interested in historical, institutional and theoretical analyses that rethink the nature of politics in line with promoting and entrenching important practices toward justice and democracy.

Studies in Human Rights, Suzy Lee and Alexandra Moore, eds.
Recognizing the growing need for scholarship in human rights that is legible within, across, and outside of traditional disciplinary boundaries, this series addresses a broad range of human rights issues and actors from innovative perspectives. The series includes humanities and social sciences research -- theoretical, empirical, or material -- grounded in human rights as a complex legal, political, rhetorical, and moral framework. We welcome submissions that examines the contested histories and the limits of human rights normative discourses as well as human rights vernaculars and novel applications of rights concepts.

Thought and Legacy of Leo Strauss, Kenneth Hart Green, ed.
Books in this series deal directly with the interpretation of Strauss's thought in its various aspects, or with the explication of his diverse writings. Naturally the approach to Strauss's thought and writings may be either sympathetic or critical. Studies in which Strauss's works are compared with the works of other important thinkers are also welcome. We also expect to publish works dedicated to the exploration of themes and issues which follow from Strauss's thought (i.e., "his legacy"), but do not deal directly with his thought or writings. We would also like to consider translations of important works on Strauss from other languages.

Psychology

Integral Theory, Sean Esbjörn-Hargens, ed.
With roots in the yoga of Sri Aurobindo and a more recent articulation by Ken Wilber, integral theory is a worldview that seeks a comprehensive understanding of humans and the universe by combining psychological, social, and spiritual insights in a single framework. This series is starting off with books that put integral theory together with psychotherapy, education, and recovery. Many other topics will be explored in future volumes.

Transpersonal and Humanistic Psychology, Richard D. Mann, ed.
Transpersonal psychology is a branch of humanistic psychology concerned with understanding and cultivating spirituality in human experience. The books in this series deal with topics like yoga, Buddhism, consciousness, meditation, psychotherapy, education, and psychedelics from this perspective. Included in the series are the works of Stanislav Grof, founder of the field and SUNY Press’s best-selling author of all time

Religious Studies

Hindu Studies, Wendy Doniger, ed.
This is a series on the Hindu religion, including considerations of texts and practices. It also includes larger considerations of Indian culture heavily embedded in Hinduism, such as scholarship on imaginative literature in Indian languages.

Islam, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, ed.
The series on Islam focuses on the theology and philosophy of this tradition. It includes translations and material in historical context. The series is particularly strong on material on Sufism, the mystical tradition of Islam. The series editor is one of the best-known Muslim intellectuals in the West.

Religion and the Environment, Harold Coward, ed.
This series seeks to explore all areas of religious thought and practice as it both conceives and impacts the natural world, with particular interest in the current ongoing environmental devastation of the planet. The series is cross-cultural and will consider works from all traditions. A wide range of scholarly approaches is welcome, including: ecotheology, environmental thought from the standpoint of a particular tradition, ethics, explorations of traditional thought and practice, comparative studies, explorations of spiritually-based environmental movements and practices, and engagements with scientific developments such as genomics.

Religious Studies, Harold Coward, ed.
This series is broadly conceived to include analyses of particular aspects of a religious tradition; thematic comparative studies; and focused studies of religion and society in areas such as the arts, law, economics, the social sciences, and politics. We publish monographs and edited volumes that appeal to a broad readership including research scholars, faculty, students, and educated lay readers.

Theology and Continental Thought, Douglas L. Donkel, ed.
Presents books where theology uses continental thought. This is a particularly vital conversation at the present time. While these schools of thought are often considered antithetical, many among the current generation of theologians have been trained in, and appreciate, continental thought. Increasingly those on the continental side have become interested in approaching some concept of God.

Western Esoteric Traditions, David Appelbaum, ed.
A collection of scholarly work which touches on the full range of esoteric thought, spanning Gnosticism, Hermetism, magic, astrology, alchemy, Rosicrucianism, Christian Theosophy, and more. Although primarily Western in focus, the series features material on various strands of Eastern religions—Buddhist, Hindu, and Sufi—that share esoteric orientation and influence. The series includes both original contributions and secondary works in religious studies, literature, history, and philosophy.