The Gathering of Reason

Second Edition

By John Sallis

Subjects: History Of Philosophy
Series: SUNY series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy
Paperback : 9780791464540, 215 pages, May 2005
Hardcover : 9780791464533, 215 pages, May 2005

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Table of contents

Preface to the First Edition

Preface to the Second Edition

Introduction

I. INTERPRETIVE HORIZONS

 

1. The Problem of Metaphysics
2. Gathering
3. Modes of Gathering

 

II. THE TRANSCENDENTAL DIALECTIC

 

1. Transcendental Illusion
2. Reason
3. Ideas
4. Derivation of the Ideas

 

III. THE GATHERING OF REASON IN THE PARALOGISMS

 

1. Paralogism in General

 

(a) The Issues of Paralogism
(b) Transcendental Apperception
(c) Transcendental Paralogism

 

2. The Four Paralogisms

 

(a) Substantiality
(b) Simplicity
(c) Personality
(d) Ideality

 

3. Projective Interpretation of the Paralogisms

 

IV. THE GATHERING OF REASON IN THE ANTINOMIES

 

1. The Cosmological Ideas
2. The Four Antinomies
3. The Interest of Reason
4. The Critical Solution of the Antinomies
5. The Regulative Employment of Reason
6. Freedom and Necessity
7. Projective Interpretation of the Antinomies

 

V. THE GATHERING OF REASON IN THE IDEAL

 

1. The Transcendental Ideal
2. The Existence of God
3. Projective Interpretation of the Ideal

 

VI. REASON, IMAGINATION, MADNESS

 

1. Inversion
2. Imagination
3. Imagination and Dialectical Illusion

 

VII. METAPHYSICAL SECURITY AND THE PLAY OF IMAGINATION

 

1. The Play of Absence
2. The Play of Critical Metaphysics
3. The Play of Imagination

 

Afterword to the Second Edition: Kant and the Greeks

Notes

Index

This second edition of the author's classic study of Kant's First Critique includes a new preface and extensive afterword.

Description

This second edition of The Gathering of Reason expands on John Sallis's classic study of Kant's First Critique. This study examines the relation of imagination to reason and to human knowledge and action in general. Moving simultaneously at several different hermeneutical levels, Sallis carries out an interpretation of the Transcendental Dialectic of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. Although, in contrast to the Analytic, the Dialectic seldom refers explicitly to imagination, Sallis shows that the concept of reason in the Dialectic requires the complicity of imagination. Sallis demonstrates that for Kant, reason alone does not suffice for bringing before our minds the metaphysical ideas of the soul, the world, and God; rather it is through the force of imagination that these ideas are brought forth and made effective. A new preface situates the book in relation to Sallis's later work, and an extensive afterword focuses on Kant and the Greeks.

John Sallis is Frederick J. Adelman Professor of Philosophy at Boston College. He has written many books, including Platonic Legacies and Double Truth, both published by SUNY Press.