Social and Cultural History

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The Archaeology of Inequality

Brings together archaeologists, art historians, sociologists, and classicists to explore the origins and development of unequal relationships in ancient societies.

Empire News

Examines English-language Indian newspapers from the mid-nineteenth century and their role in simultaneously sustaining and probing British colonial governance.

Seeing Symphonically

Looks at how a group of aesthetically innovative independent films contested and imagined alternatives to urban planning in midcentury New York.

Reading, Wanting, and Broken Economics

Uses a historical study of bookselling and readers as a way to question and rethink our understanding of the market for symbolic goods.

The Specter of Babel

Presents a new way of thinking about fundamental political concepts such as freedom, justice, and the common good.

An Unfinished Revolution

The story of the suffrage movement and the ongoing struggle for women’s rights through the lens of one family’s history.

Freedom in Laughter

Analyzes the dynamic period in which Dick Gregory and Bill Cosby moved African American professional stand-up comedy from the chitlin’ circuit to the mainstream.

Bending the Arc

Inspiring collection narrating how peace activists found their calling and why the world still needs peace activism.

The Great Agrarian Conquest

Groundbreaking analysis of how colonialism created new conceptual categories and spatial forms that reshaped rural societies.

Postnormal Conservation

Explores the evolving role of botanic gardens from products and enablers of modernity and the nation-state, to their recent reinvention as institutions of environmental governance.

Essays of a Lifetime

A distillation of the historian’s finest writings on modern Indian historical themes.

From the Streets to the State

Blends academic and activist perspectives to explore recent emancipatory struggles to win and transform state power.

Respectability on Trial

By Brian Donovan
Subjects: History

Recovers and chronicles the plights of ordinary New Yorkers that resonate with contemporary debates on rape and domestic violence.

Stairway to Empire

The story of the Erie Canal’s completion and its place in the larger narrative of American modernity and progress.

How to Escape

Passionate and rollicking personal and intellectual essays by philosopher Crispin Sartwell.

Key to the Northern Country

Offers nearly forty years of interdisciplinary scholarship on the Hudson River Valley’s role in the American Revolution.

The Untold Story of Champ

The definitive account of a Lake Champlain legend.

Letters to ONE

Collection of letters written to the first openly gay magazine in the United States.

Masked Voices

An analysis of unpublished letters to the first American gay magazine reveals the agency, adaptation, and resistance occurring in the gay community during the McCarthy era.

Blood at the Root

Examines the relationship of lynching to black and white citizenship in the 19th and 20th century U. S. through a focus on historical, visual, cultural, and literary texts.

We Used to Own the Bronx

An inside story of privilege, inherited wealth, and the bizarre values and customs of the American upper crust.

Political Identity and Social Change

Explores issues of political identity and the social changes that ended apartheid in South Africa.

Race, Neighborhoods, and Community Power

By Neil Kraus
Subjects: History

Examines the extent to which race affected public policy formation in Buffalo, New York between 1934 and 1997.

Reinventing Government or Reinventing Ourselves

Viewing the public as owners rather than customers of government, this book argues that better performance by public agencies requires active and responsible citizens as well as efficient organizations.

Bridging the Atlantic

This collection of historical, philosophical, sociopolitical, and literary essays examines the linkages between the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America.

The Two Milpas of Chan Kom

An ethnographic account of Chan Kom, a contemporary Maya community in Yucatan, Mexico that focuses on the social schism within the community resulting from an accelerated process of migration to Cancun, a major tourist center.

Notes from Underground

Describes the Russian rock music counterculture and how it is changing in response to Russia's transition from a socialist to a capitalist society. It explores the lived experiences, the thoughts and feelings of the rock musicians as they meet the challenges of change.

A Measure of Success

This book examines the role Protestants played in the formation of the public culture of antebellum Cleveland, a developing commercial city typical of many cities throughout the Midwest. The author analyzes ...

The Gentle General

This is the first major biography of Rose Pesotta, the organizer and vice president of the International Ladies Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU) from 1933 to 1944. After moving to the United States from ...

The Cold War and Academic Governance

This book examines the harassment of the Johns Hopkins University sinologist Owen Lattimore during the height of the Cold War on campus. It moves from detailing the specifics of Lattimore's case to a ...

Abandoned Children

Edited by Rachel G. Fuchs
Introduction by Rachel G. Fuchs
Subjects: History

In nineteenth-century France, parents abandoned their children in overwhelming numbers—up to 20 percent of live births in the Parisian area. The infants were left at state-run homes and were then transferred ...