Talking about a Revolution

The Languages of Educational Reform

By Jacqueline Cossentino

Subjects: School Change And Reform
Series: SUNY series, Teacher Preparation and Development, SUNY series, Restructuring and School Change
Paperback : 9780791460207, 184 pages, October 2004
Hardcover : 9780791460191, 184 pages, March 2004

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Table of contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

PART I: INTRODUCTION

1. Teaching and Meaning

2. How Reform Means

PART II: THE LANGUAGES OF EDUCATIONAL REFORM

3. Exhibition as Test

4. Exhibition as Pedagogy

5. Exhibition as Curriculum

6. Exhibition as Rite of Passage

PART III: TEACHER AS COACH: REVISING ROLES, TRANSFORMING PRACTICE

7. Teacher as Designer

8. Teacher as Manager

9. Teacher as Critic

10. Conclusion: Policy, Practice, and a New Role for Language

Appendix A: Methodology

Appendix B: Rubrics

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Analyzes how teachers attempt to translate the language of reform into pedagogical action.

Description

Talking about a Revolution tells the story of school reform from the perspective of teachers engaged in it, illuminating the complexity of teachers' roles in transforming policy into practice. Al, Brian, and Camille teach at a large, comprehensive high school in a suburb of a major mid-western city. They use the languages of educational reform to inspire new ways to think about teaching, to shield themselves from the confusion of contradictory understandings of reform, and to construct a shared understanding of what reformed teaching might mean.

Jacqueline Cossentino is Assistant Professor in the Department of Education Policy and Leadership at the University of Maryland at College Park.