General Interest

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Signs of the Literary Times

This book is O'Rourke's first volume of nonfiction since his 1972 The Harrisburg 7 and the New Catholic Left, which Garry Wills hailed as "a clinical x-ray of our society's condition. " That book prompted ...

A Barfield Sampler

This is a collection of the fiction and poetry of one of the twentieth century's most influential and significant thinkers. Barfield is known widely for his explorations of human consciousness, the history ...

Emily Dickinson, Woman of Letters

Buried in Emily Dickinson's letters are many lines that are stunningly beautiful, as beautiful as any to be found in her poems. Lewis Turco has taken some of these lines and written poems from them, on ...

Reading Old Friends

Reading Old Friends includes essays, reviews, and poems on poetics. Matthias, who has spent much time in England, concentrates on British poetry ranging from late modernist figures such as David Jones ...

Borrowed Lives

Borrowed Lives is a novel. It is an enactment of issues of literary philosophy and criticism, including the question of whether there can be originality, coherence, and authenticity in life and art. It ...

Boehme

This is a biography of one of the most original and one of the least understood seminal writers of the Baroque world, Jacob Boehme.

In a period tormented by mysteries and controversies, Boehme's visionary ...

Notions of the Americans

Notions of the Americans in considered Cooper's first work of non-fiction despite a thin overlay of character and plot. Written in the form of a travel narrative, it addresses the widespread ignorance ...

The Red Rover

Turning to his own extensive maritime experience, Cooper's novel, written in Paris in 1827, reflects his immersion in the romantic movement that was sweeping the Continent. European readers enjoyed his ...

The Darkness and the Light

In this book Charles Hartshorne continues his contribution to the field with autobiographical reflections, showing the causal conditions which made his career possible.

"There is some advantage in associating ...

Satanstoe, or the Littlepage Manuscripts

Though Satanstoe has been too much neglected by readers of Cooper's time and ours, it is one of his most interesting books, combining nostalgic autobiographical recollections, pictures of manners, action ...

The Two Admirals

Author of the first scholarly history of the United States Navy, James Fenimore Cooper had long hoped to commemorate the American Navy by representing its fleet in action. Since no such fleet existed ...

Cardinal Giacomo Antonelli and Papal Politics in European Affairs

Coppa provides the first full-length study of Giacomo Antonelli, friend and advisor to Pope Pius IX (Pio Nono) and his Secretary of State and chief minister from 1849 to 1876. Based on the documents of ...

The Book of Strangers

Sometime in the future the head librarian at a great center of learning suddenly disappears, leaving behind a journal that describes his weariness with a world "where people teach but know nothing, where ...

Pattern Poetry

Pattern poetry—poetry from before 1900 that fuses literature and visual art—has existed since the times of ancient Crete and Egypt. Less well known than modern visual poetry, pattern poetry has been ...

The Deerslayer or the First Warpath

Written during a nostalgic interval during Cooper's stormy battles with the Whig Press, The Deerslayer (1841) is the last of the world-famous Leatherstocking Tales in point of composition, though first ...

The American Sublime

Edited by Mary Arensberg
Subjects: General Interest

American poetics has been radicalized in recent years by revisionist theories which replay and ground poets against their Romantic precursors. Beginning with the sublime politics of Emerson and ending ...

The Pilot

Having drawn on local knowledge and private information for The Spy and on his own boyhood experiences for The Pioneers, it was inevitable that Cooper would seek a way to convert yet another area of his ...

Heart of a Family

"I got a damn hip musician, a poet, and . . . well, a spoiled kid, I guess."

Jesse Landow, while recovering from a heart attack, describes his three sons in this quote. This sentence from this moving novel ...

Prairie, The: A Tale

In the spring of 1826, soon after the publication of The Last of the Mohicans, James Fenimore Cooper immersed himself in The Prairie. In taking Natty Bumppo from his beloved forests of New York state ...

Lionel Lincoln: or, The Leaguer of Boston

Written to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the beginnings of the American Revolution, Lionel Lincoln was a radically new experiment in historical fiction. To recreate its events with the utmost ...

Teresa - A Woman

She was a saint, a mystic, a reformer, a legend, and she was a fascinating and complex woman. This is the first full-scale biography of Saint Teresa of Avila from a human, nonconfessional point of view. ...

Sarah

Sarah is the detailed case history of a UCLA undergraduate, written by a UCLA psychology professor. It is a unique case of psychological survival. Despite vicious sexual abuse, Sarah has managed to adapt, ...

Plato's Defence of Poetry

Ignorant, irrational and irresponsible: these are the terms used by Plato when referring to poets. Yet the philosopher acknowledged that he was not insensible to the charms of poetry, and many would agree ...

The World of Yesterday's Humanist Today

Edited by Marion Sonnenfeld
Subjects: General Interest

Fifty years ago, Stefan Zweig, who committed suicide in 1942, was the most widely read and translated living writer in the world. Zweig's Vienna was a world of bright, brittle superficialities, in which ...

The Last of the Mohicans

Celebrated for almost 150 years as the prototype of the American adventure story, The Last of the Mohicans remains a perennial favorite, an astonishingly complex work to be read on many levels. Irradiated ...

Wyandotte, or the Hutted Knoll

"One of the misfortunes of a nation, is to hear little besides its own praises," wrote James Fenimore Cooper in his Preface to Wyandotté in 1843. The novel arrived at a time when a patriotic mythology ...

The Pioneers or the Sources of the Susquehanna

Written in 1821-22 at a crucial point in Cooper's life and based on some of his most cherished youthful memories, The Pioneers today evokes the American pioneering experience with astonishing vibrance ...

The Pathfinder

With the publication of The Pathfinder in 1840, James Fenimore Cooper engaged in what he called the "hazardous experiment" of reviving one of his most popular characters who had been allowed to die in ...

Newdick's Season of Frost

In 1935 Professor Robert Newdick of Ohio State University wrote to Robert Frost—already America's most famous living poet—in order to suggest certain revisions in the arrangement of the poet's collected ...

Musical Allusions in the Works of James Joyce

Professor Bowen's book is more than a simple collection of musical allusions; it is an engaging discussion of how Joyce uses music to expand and orchestrate his major themes. The introductions to the ...

The Gaucho Martin Fierro

This is a poem of protest drawn from the life of the gaucho, who was forced to yield his freedom and individuality to the social and material changes that invaded his beloved pampas--a protest which arose ...

Book of Good Love

A masterpiece in the tradition of the Decameron and the Canterbury Tales, Juan Ruiz's fourteenth-century Spanish narrative poem combines the comic and the serious, the bawdy and the practical, the satiric ...

Swinburne's Theory of Poetry

Charles Algernon Swinburne's literary reputation rests almost exclusively upon his poetry, and though his critical writings were voluminous, they are usually slighted by literary historians. Examinations ...

Hawthorne's View of the Artist

The Hawthorne depicted by Professor Bell in these pages will be as much of a surprise to many readers as is his appearance in the rare 1847 daguerreotype reproduced on the book-jacket. "This virtually ...

Doctrine and Poetry

To our modern sensibilities, "doctrine" and "poetry" may seem antithetical, but the medieval Christian found nothing conflicting in them. In this provocative book, Bernard F. Huppe outlines the influence of Augustinian doctrine upon old English poetry and shows that their association was so close as to be indissoluble.